Mount Dora, Florida

adventure of the week, Florida, Travel, United States

A few years ago my baby sister took on the challenge of buying her first home with her fiancé. While staying in Orlando proper would have kept their commute down, they decided they needed a break from their lives in the tourism industry and they selected something further afield. Thus, they selected a cute little suburb of Orlando to create a home in.

Along with their three (yes three) cats they moved to the small and quaint town of Mount Dora, Florida. Known as the highest point in Florida, the township is affectionately understood as a “mountain”, in the closest form of “mountain” Florida can get. (Mind you I may have a slanted view being a Colorado girl, also my sister is a Colorado girl and we can’t understand why she ran away to live in the heat).

Their home was built in 1924 and is full of old-growth trees! The entire city blooms and is covered with a mist of Spanish Moss.

Anyway, mountain or hill, Mount Dora is well known as an artistic and charming community of retirees and hippies, offering up art festivals, weekly farmers markets, and some of the best antiquing in central Florida. It is also considered the most Christmas-filled town in America (I don’t get this because HEAT), and thousands flock to the city to celebrate the holidays, lights, and find some old town American charm.

While they purchased the home in 2017, I was not able to visit this beloved community, until this fall, where I had the pleasure to attend my sister’s wedding and find some fun. I was pleasantly surprised and revived visiting the little city! Here are some of my favorites in the town and why it is worth a stop on your journey through the area.

Where to Eat

WAVE (Sushi) – This was by far my favorite dinner place for the trip. The food was phenomenal, well-priced, and absolutely delicious (landlocked states lack in fresh seafood). The restaurant has gained a following for their Sushi Donuts, Sushi Burritos, and Sushi Burgers all which seem to defy physics. All of which are delicious and enjoyable, if hard to eat! They offered phenomenal options for Gluten Free food, and the staff was considerate, aware, and caring about our needs. I would recommend this place for any visitor to Mount Dora!

HIGHLAND STREET CAFE – This sweet little charmer is about a block away from my sister’s and while it is bordering on the “too cute” spectrum, they offer humble and satisfying eats for a fair price. The staff is super sweet and well versed in food needs. If you need a fast, homemade meal, this is a perfect breakfast and lunch spot.

FESTIVALS

The town is affectionately known as the “Festival City” with events and activities going on almost every week, or at least a couple times a month. While we were there in late October, the city was doing an art festival. At Halloween they had a downtown event for kids and families and soon after they were hosting holiday lightings and events. Check out events on your vacation here.

WALKS

The city is home to a small lighthouse, celebrating Florida’s nautical history. Photo by: Daniel Piraino

Unlike most American towns, Mount Dora is extremely walkable and offers a lot of opportunities for exploration and enjoyment. The downtown is full of small inns and bed and breakfasts which only need to be parked at. Then it’s extremely easy to walk to everything you might need including shopping, dining, nightlife, the main lake of the city, and some trails. If you are brave enough to exercise in the heat, the city is home to many nature trails that are ideal for hiking, biking, and exploring the Florida wilds, click here.

Overall Mount Dora is a great place to stop in Central Florida. If you have an extra day and want to get out of the chaos of Orlando, or if you need an escape to some charm, Mount Dora is sure to please!

Swimming with Manatees- Crystal River, Florida

adventure of the week, Florida, History, outdoors, United States

A few years ago a co-worker informed me that you can swim with wild MANATEES in Florida! As you know, if you follow this blog, I adore animal encounters. Learning manatees are an option meant they went to the top of my list for my Florida vacation 2019.

Photo Courtesy of River Ventures

Manatees are a native species to Florida, and are considered an important part of the ecosystem and culture of the state. Before Europeans arrived the animals were a valuable part to the winter diets of Native populations in the Southeast. Early European explorers to the Southern United States thought they were some type of mermaid, and myths and legends abounded about the “sea cows”. They also hunted some types into extinction.

By the 20th century the animals were threatened due to pollution, boats, and loss of habitat. In 2019 though, the numbers have greatly increased and they are now a vulnerable versus an endangered species. However, the biggest threat to these animals continues to be humans, and impending climate change.

You are so lucky because you live on the west coast of Florida, where there are lots and lots of manatees, … Most of the kids in the country don’t know about manatees and how wonderful they are.

John Lithgow

My intrigue with manatees began when I was a little kid, an animal lover, and I learned about the oddly majestic water mammals. I was extremely concerned for their well-being regarding the damage boats were doing to them, and I have followed their bounce back over the last 20 years or so. Thus, having the chance to get dirty and go visit some of the critters was simply something I could not pass up!

Researching the trip, I learned that some the best viewing areas for manatees is in Crystal River, Florida, about two hours west of Orlando. Located on the gulf coast, the area has the perfect blend of warm waters fed by underground aquifers that the manatees adore. The beasts like things to be 70°F +, and can die in temperatures below 68°F. When the gulf coast gets cold, especially in the winter months, the animals move inland to the naturally warm fresh water.

I ended up selecting the company, River Ventures, as they vocally expressed their concern and work to protect the gentle giants, and they came highly rated in Trip Advisor and other locations. We selected their group tour, flight and early at 7:15 a.m. and waited with anticipation for our adventure.

A youth manatee at Crystal River

At 4:00 a.m. on a Saturday in October my sister and I carb loaded, drank some tea and coffee and drove the pitch black highways of western Florida to Crystal River. We wore swimsuits under our clothes, and made sure we were well equipped with towels and equipment to make the most of a three hour adventure. As a severely nearsighted person I purchased snorkel goggles with adjusted lenses, and as a video nerd I bought a small 4k camera to film our adventure. These investments proved to be priceless!

The company started before our scheduled time and offered coffee, bathrooms, and friendly rescue dog snuggles (a total bonus). Everyone was enthusiastic to participate in the adventure and we chatted happily with other travelers. Before long we were sat in to watch an educational video, discuss wet suits, and change into said suits before a short bus ride took us to the canal boats we were to sail on.

(c) Photo courtesy of River Ventures

It took a while to find some manatees in the canals, we were early for the season, but several manatees had come inland sensing a storm and cooling period on the horizon. The added bonus of sailing the canals for 40 minutes was that we could take in dozens of birds and the sunrise over the canals, offering a charming glimpse into the ecosystem of the area.

While the canals lay on ancient foundations fed by springs the area has been built up with houses and boating enthusiasts. However, with as many people as there are living in the area there was an active group participation in preservation and safety for the animals. Every few docks posted signs about manatees, people named their boats after the animals, and the tour companies that regularly operate in the area work together to tell people about manatee spotting, patterns they have seen, and other important details. This community spirit is vital in the preservation of the region and unique animals that inhabit the area.

(C) Photo by River Ventures

Once we had found a good manatee for visiting, and by good manatee they mean one that is docile and experienced with people, we got our goggles and snorkels ready to go, climbed into the cool waters, and let the wet suits and pool noodles do their jobs to keep us afloat.

Slowly we approached the 40+ year old manatee that we were meant to visit. The big girl was affectionately known as “Red Hot Poker” due to the red algae she grows on her back during certain times of the year. “Red” was not only an elder member of the manatee community, but she was also very pregnant and due to give birth at any time.

I expected the manatees to be large, one can not truly understand their size until you come upon them in murky waters. My experience was one of slowly swimming to the rest of my group with “Red” and coming upon a massive grey beast lurking in the water. For scale, imagine how disconcerting it would be to swim upon a car hood in a small and shallow canal. Her tail fin was in fact the size of a car hood, and showed her decades of swimming, boat encounters, and life in the canals and gulf.

Swimming upon any animal besides a fish is a truly remarkable experience, to visit with such an ancient queen of Florida was truly breathtaking. The guides referred to these beasts as Buddhas due to their calm relationship with their surroundings. The animals simply float, eat, experience, and interact with their world in a second by second manner. They take in the movement and landscape with nerves on their body that sense people and object undetected by their small eyes and poor eyesight. So calm about their existence “Red” simply went about her business grazing on sea grass and coming up for air every few minutes, even with fifteen nosy tourists sticking their nose in her business. “Red” was so calm that she would rise up under myself and other swimmers to get a breath, here she would swim against my hands and was totally unmoved by them being there. Her sense knew I was there all along, but she didn’t care that I touched her in a friendly reminder or hello.

(C) Photo by River Ventures
(C) Photo by River Ventures

Our interaction with “Red” was nothing short of amazing, in the taking breath ones away and wanting to cry it’s so profound, way. I could not believe how peaceful she floated about her day, obviously aware we were curious, and aware that we meant her only peace and friendship. To be face to face with a wild animal that was so calm was a fascinating glimpse into a world beyond our own comprehension and reactions. No wonder early settlers and native cultures were equally intrigued by these majestic animals.

Our time with “Red” came to an end, but before heading back we stopped to view an aquifer, known as Jurassic Spring, that fed the canals with warm water. It was there that a youth manatee swam through our group on the run from a larger group of snorkelers. We called it a day, and followed the directions to return to our boat and back to the tour beginnings.

(C) Photo by River Ventures

In support of the cause we bought our photos, some cute souvenirs, and with giant grins on our face we headed back to Orlando. Ending a truly magical morning in the fresh waters of Crystal River, Florida. With, as my husband calls them, sea potatoes.

Have you swam with manatees? What was your experience like?

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Happy Travels!

Ethical Animal Encounters

musings

I am the type of person that goes “OOOOHHHH ELK” while driving through Colorado’s Mountains. I squee at ‘airy Coos in Scotland and I have paid to do Goat Yoga. I adore animals, and I adore seeing animals in different parts of the country and world.

My conundrum is how can one enjoy animals and love being around them when there is a chance of them being treated unethically or downright cruelly?

I’m an animal rights supporter, at least to a point. I’ve been a pescatarian or vegetarian for going on 15 years due to my qualms with industrial farming, and health reasons. I have adopted both my cats from a local rescue. I try to reduce my plastic consumption, I recycle, I buy fish that comes from certified “ocean friendly”.

You get my point, I try to live consciously and make positive decisions on how I spend my money. Yet, when it comes to travel, things get a little murky on decisions and who to turn to.

While many companies have stopped offering a tourist attractions because of animal welfare concerns (such as Tripadvisor and Viator), there are just as many independent companies still offering experience. Even while Viator has stopped sharing elephant rides, they still have dolphin and whale experiences and shows dotting the globe. This is even with documentaries that shined light on the horrors of such attractions, such as the Cove and Blackfish.

While companies are changing to meet new consumer demands, there is still a huge grey area between “okay” and “not”. No doubt, the rising popularity of platforms like Instagram, TikTok, Snap Chat and Facebook mean that people are seeking out experiences to share online and increase their popularity. Then there are instances where tourism boards still condone activities, even though other parts of the world have criticized the practice.


This is perhaps most profound in Thailand and other parts of Southern Asia, where animal encounters are big money. Thailand adores its elephant population, and elephants have been a huge part of Thai culture, and now tourism, for centuries. However, while much of the western world has discredited elephant rides and performances, Thailand’s tourism still has booms in elephant rides throughout the country. While many websites tout “ethical” practices, many argue that there is no way to “ethically” train an elephant due to the practices of breaking them.

While there is evidence of more humane training and care for elephants, the reality is there is no true way to know what you are signing up for when you want to ride or even visit an elephant. The tough question is: is there any other way to see elephant in an ethical way? Since many elephants in “retirement” were once abused, there is reason to visit and support them in their golden years. Yet, ultimately, does this continue to perpetuate itself and who gets to call the rating on ethical or not? Even some “no riding” camps have been known to change faces in the afternoon for a new tour group, depending on the location. Then there are allegations of beating, drugging, and removal of infants from mothers.

On top of all these damning evidence, there is still a desire to see and interact with these animals. So what is one to do?