10 Must Try Foods of Scotland

musings, Scotland, Travel

Scotland is known for greasy and sometimes odd concoctions, often the result of crafty people that used every, and I mean EVERY part of their food sources. Once you get past the initial, “what the….[insert expletive]” you are likely to enjoy the treats.

10. Deep Fried Mars Bars

Scotland is known for its love of the deep fryer, almost as well as the American South is. One of their better, and disgustingly wonderful treats is a deep fried Mars Candy Bar. Step one – buy a Mars bar, step two – batter the bar, step three – deep fry until its crispy outside and a gooey mess on the inside. It’s sinfully good.

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9. Irn Bru

Scotland is one of the only nations in the world where Coca Cola is not the most popular soda. Instead, they have their neon orange amalgamation, IRN BRU (pronounced URN BREW). To Americans, you will notice it tastes like liquid penicillin we got as children (I know!) to the rest of the world it’s something resembling bottled cotton candy.

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8. Scotch Eggs

This treat sounds weird, but it’s really a tasty appetizer. It’s a boiled egg, wrapped in sausage, then breaded. Then it’s baked or deep fried. It’s an appealing savory delight with an umami sensation.

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7. Neeps and Tatties

This sounds almost mystical, but it’s really just mashed potatoes and equally mushy turnips. Both are excellent when made right and nutritious. (see number 2 for the proper serving)

6. Scottish Salmon

Scotland has some of the most amazing Atlantic Salmon in the world. Their sustainable farm raising prevents over fishing, and a premium product. Commonly, (when found stateside) it’s smoked and served as a fantastic protein in fine cuisine. Try with some capers or cream cheese.

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5. A Full Scottish [Breakfast]

Brace yourself for this one. Rather fast for this one. Scottish Breakfasts, like most of the British Isles, is a practical feast, and possibly the only meal you’ll eat for the day. It often has several types of sausage (including blood sausage), beans, toast, eggs, mushrooms, sometimes porridge…. and up to the chef’s discretion some other treats. It’s commonly served with tea and sometimes oatmeal. If you can eat it all, props. ALSO, vegetarian versions are equally delectable and satisfying.

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4. Flapjacks

In the United States this is another loosely used term for pancakes. In Scotland it’s a granola oat-bar kind of thing. Almost like a cookie, these buttery treats are ideal for a snack with a cup of tea, or just as a great treat. They are divine when freshly made and sold.

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3. Shortbread

As one of Scotland’s better known treats, it’s important to try this treat when in Alba. Walker’s may corner the U.S. market, but many fine bakeries create and sell their own versions of the treat for visitors and locals alike.

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2. Haggis

Haggis has a bad reputation. But the reality is that it’s a very tasty national dish and one that is logical for nutrition and practicality concerns. The dish uses every part of an animal in a way so as to maximize flavor and necessity. While traditional haggis is not legal in the United States, trying it fresh and hot in Scotland is an important initiation right (the vegetarian version is also very good and is made of nuts, oats, mushrooms etc).

Keep Reading if you want to know what’s in the dish….or skip to 1.

Haggis is made by using a butchered sheep’s (or calf’s) stomach. Inside the stomach goes left over organ meat such as lungs, heart, liver, fat (suet) etc. then the rest of the space is filled with oats and seasoning (this is all cooked before hand). The stomach gets tied shut andΒ  then it is boiled and/or baked to perfection.

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1. Wee Dram of Scotch

No trip or palate journey through Scotland is complete without trying some of the national drink, SCOTCH. Most places cut the little bit of liquor with water, swish, and then allow the consumer to taste and play with it in the mouth before swallowing. Follow the professional’s recommendation and go slow. Scotch is for the flavor, not the buzz.

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Consider Scotland for your next adventure!

History, Scotland, Travel, United Kingdom

If you love and live in Colorado it can be hard to find somewhere as beautiful to vacation in. Not to sound snobby but when sights like this

are in your backyard, it’s sometimes hard to be blown away other places.

Yet I have been to Europe quite a few times and it has never disappointed. My most recent trip left me in Scotland for most of the month I was away, and it was amazing!

Edinburgh is my favorite, for being a gorgeous gothic city with ancient and medieval bases.

and the castle is awesome!

Graveyards feel more romantic than macabre.

The street performers are a hoot and a half.

The architecture stunning

and Scotland has so much natural beauty everywhere

Even when you’re freezing in winter

and there are COWS!

The most beautiful castles…

Keep a lookout for Nessie

And wear some dancing shoes.

It’s truly magical, and something dreams are made of.

Best,

Rebecca Lee Robinson

Sew Baby Sew!

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Sew. Well the actual stitching part hasn’t happened yet. But I am getting somewhere. Since it has been rainy and stressful I not only finished the book I was reading and I REALLY worked on costumes for Halloween.I bought my fabric a few weeks ago online to a few problems. 1 the wool I ordered was SUIT wool not wool for making a cape, so instead I went to the store and actually bought a black wool/polyester blend for only about $9/yard, I got less than recommended for my pattern, but I knew I didn’t want it way long on me, and too much wool becomes really heavy really fast. Especially on all the other layers I will be wearing.

black felt for cape

I also was not super fond of the color of linen I ordered, I wanted it to have a little more GREEN in it, so I bought a packet of forest green Dylon fabric dye to alter the color slightly, which I let my linen sit in for about an hour and got some great results.

Dylon
dye job- use the sick for easy clean up and rubber mixer so as not to stain
LEFT: original color Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β RIGHT: after dying

Other than that my white fabric for my chemise is perfect, white and a good sort of wrinkly, I’m excited about the results of that as well, but slightly concerned over if the sleeves will be long enough.

Gauzy white

I’m also using these patterns, with slight revisions (more on that later):

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Ryan’s costume is SO simple. If you want to do a GREAT KILT for Halloween, buy 5 yards of fabric, look up a tutorial and GO. That’s it. Granted Ryan already has a shirt from when we did the Princess Bride and we ordered some simply boots he can wear with socks and voila.

NOTE ON WIDTH: I couldn’t find 60″ wide plaid material ANYWHERE unless I wanted to buy a kilt, the cheapest was $220. So I went to Joann, bought 44″ wide cotton flannel (like for shirts) and made sure to get something close to a traditional tartan (Stuart Hunting) , which as far as I trust should be just fine. NOTE ON YARDS: you may not need 5 yards, less may work just fine, it all depends on how much you want to spent and how big your kilt wearer is.

 

KILT TUTORIAL:

Hopefully I’ll look as awesome as this!

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