Keep Making Plans

Travel

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by life. We live in a culture that celebrates being constantly busy. We find ourselves overloaded with clubs and projects and cleaning that it’s hard to feel like it’s worthwhile to think about next week let alone next year.

Yet, in the planning of life and goals, if one does not plan ahead, one often misses the boat on being able to do all the things on dreams of.

I have found time and time again that if I actually plan for something, it will happen. It isn’t just penciling in a vacation or tentatively agreeing to something, it’s committing to a promise you made yourself! It’s a promise that is easier to keep when you begin laying the framework to make it happen.

While it’s not always easy to keep plans going, it is easier to work on plans when you know what needs to be done. Here are my tips for a successful plan framework, when committing to travel.

Life is unbelievably short, but you can pack more into your short ride on earth if you work hard, research, and plan out your fun for maximum benefit!

Steps for Successful Trip Planning

  1. Research where you what you want the most
    1. Some places may be fiscally out of reach unless you save for 20 years, which makes it an unrealistic goal, at least for right now.
    1. Prioritize what is most important. Is it more important to see such and such place, or stay in a nice hotel.
    1. Think about the “I can’t do that anywhere else”. Meaning if you REALLY want to have Giraffes eat breakfast with you, plan and budget for it. No where else in the world does Giraffe Manor quite match for drama and finesse.
    1. Think about what you can ACTUALLY save, not what you hope to save.
  2. Figure out what is needed for the trip
    1. Find out what the cost will be for EVERYTHING on the trip, then figure out your total, add some padding to that budget, then figure out how to make it work.
    1. Plan out a monthly amount you need to sock away to make it happen. Maybe it’s $50 or $500, but make sure you can make it work within your means. Put away more if you can, then you may have more mad money for the journey.
    1. Prioritize your “musts” and then cut what is unnecessary. This may mean no more morning coffees or less shopping trips, but the payoff is well worth it.
  3. Consider “cheap” travel
    1. Never has there been as easy of a time to research and plan travel. That is true for saving money on everything but the necessities. Budget airlines allow you to customize your needs (checked bags, seat selection, carry ons etc.) so if you know you don’t need much for a week away, leave it behind and skip the fees.
    1. Instead of hotels, which can eat up a lot of budget, consider bed and breakfasts, hostels, and even Airbnb-type accommodations. If safety is a worry, read reviews, check into location specifics, and ask questions.
  4. Visit friends and family
    1. If you are lucky to have friends and family living around your nation, state, or the globe consider knocking on their door. Many times my trips were only accomplished because good friends and family offered me a bed to sleep in.
    1. Visiting “locals” often means a richer journey to a place, it’s there that you make new friends and connections, experience local cuisine, and see hidden gems you would have otherwise missed.
    1. Naturally, it’s best to check in with your loved ones far ahead of time to make sure it’s okay if you take over their couch.
  5. Keep it simple
    1. It can be tempting to want to pack in “everything” on a trip, but the truth is that you miss a lot running from place to place. If you are limited on travel time due to poor vacation time allowances, this is especially true.
    1. It’s inevitable some plans will get derailed due to weather, train strikes, illness etc. so while it’s good to plan, have some wiggle room in your time abroad.
    1. Research places or things you want to see and make a list of opening times and priority locations. For example: you can walk York in the morning before places open, or in between sightseeing stops. For Venice, the canals don’t close at 5 so make sure you see museums before this time and enjoy evening splendors that are always there.
  6. Timeline It
    1. If you are limited on time off make a timeline on how long it will take you to save up enough vacation days and/or money. Add an extra month or two in case of a sick day, but this should let you figure out a good time to go.
  7. Be open to change
    1. There will be life things that mess up your plans. Your best friend may do a destination wedding. Your house may need a new roof. Be open to this possibility and be flexible with your planning. Sometimes pushing an adventure back a year is ideal over just giving up.
  8. Invite a friend
    1. One way to reduce lodging costs is to share with someone. If you have a friend, or a spouse, or niece etc. that would also be down for an adventure then have them come along. If you split a hotel room in most countries it makes a nice room much more attainable.
    1. For cruises, tours, and all-inclusive trips having a second person is almost a necessity for cost savings. Many times the single supplement almost pays for an extra person, so you might as well bring a pal!

What are your tips to making things happen?

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Plan Ahead, Avoid the Headache

musings, Travel

Probably the single biggest, and best piece of advice I can give to those wanting to travel, is that planning ahead will save the day. While it’s great to take advantage of a last minute vacation, it can also spell disaster for making the most of your travels. Of course one can over plan, more on that another day.

Essentially when it comes to traveling, especially internationally, planning can mean huge savings, better experiences, and a smoother journey than winging it on the last minute.

For example, if you are a foodie and you want to experience one of the best restaurants in the world, how likely do you think it will be that you can get a reservation at Central in Lima, Peru if you are leaving in two weeks, versus trying to make the reservation 45 days in advance? You guessed it, 45 days. This isn’t just the Michelin rated places, but Disney dining, and popular gems that bring in the crowds. If you know a place is a pinnacle of your journey, plan ahead, ask questions, and do your research.

Another example is accommodations. Unless it’s the off season, a lot of places book far in advance, meaning the crowds of people make finding a room hard. This also means that prices increase based on supply and demand (this is also true for flights). So unless you have cash to burn, booking a refundable rate well in advance secures your spot to sleep. If you get closer to the date and KNOW you are going come hell or high water, a non-refundable (if still available) can save money and secure your stay. Either way, it’s important to have something pinned and secured.

This also is true for excursions and activities. Did you know many places have a cap on how many visitors can come a day? This includes places like Machu Picchu and Yosemite. Beyond limits, many places have insane waits unless you book in advance (I’m looking at you Vatican and Uffizi). Meaning it’s almost vital to get a museum pass, book a tour, or work with a hotel concierge to get tickets in advance and this is especially true in high seasons.

I say all of this being the type A planner that I am, and being that I know from personal experience I have missed out by not planning ahead. However, if you are last minute taking off consider these tips to make it easier:

  • Use tour aggregators like Viator to find the tours/activities you want
  • Contact a tour guide or concierge service to see about getting help with details
  • Visit the tourism board websites of where you are traveling
  • Most importantly: check travel.state.gov to make sure that you don’t need a passport update or visa which could majorly foil your plans
  • Ask stupid questions of people that have been where you are going. With endless Facebook groups you are sure to get some information
  • Buy a travel guide! I can’t stress this enough for those trying to learn about a new place last minute. Lonely Planet, Rick Steves, and many others offer endlessly valuable information, not to be missed.

Happy Travels!

Also: Don’t Plan Too Much

What I Wish You Knew

colorado, musings, Travel

It’s easy in 2018 to find information on every part of the world….except when it is not.

While there are probably millions of pieces on Paris and London, there are only a handful of helpful writings on parts of American Samoa, or rural areas of Vietnam. While more people explore the world, this gap tightens, but there is always a need for better information, not more.

“Being first is irrelevant when the story is just wrong.”

While it’s great to have endless options for readings, articles, videos, and blogs, there is often a disconnect on the quality of works. Or much of the information is just outdated, poorly written, ethnocentric, exaggerated…. you get the idea.

Recently I saw a pretty popular Facebook page attached to a page through a pretty popular media company. In the video it stated that a VERY popular Colorado tourist site was only 1,000 feet above sea level. To put this into perspective, the capitol of Denver is at 5,280 feet above sea level, and this site was around 7,000 feet above sea level. The mistake was glaring and extremely unhelpful to visitors that may not know what to do with elevation gains, altitude sickness, and other problems that come with mountains.

It is mistakes like the video that create a cycle of bad information and problems for travelers, researchers, and those working in the tourism industry.

Time and time again I return to travel guides as a resource because they have many things going for them, and most importantly, they are updated and more accurate than other resources.

No doubt many bloggers and news sources try to update their work as much as possible, but travel guides have the set up to ensure their accuracy and consistency. Guides also work with companies to present information, update locations, and create a standard of information that other media sources cannot keep up with.

When I get out in the world, or run into an issue on research for work, I find that I am constantly returning to a book on the place or finding a blog that is specifically written on a set region.

What I wish all travelers knew is that it’s important to be accurate, and it’s important to provide good content. Being first is irrelevant when the story is just wrong.

Maybe the journalist in me is fighting an over-saturated market of bad blogs, but I wish I could tell people every day to buy a book, read some more, ask questions of locals. Don’t expect someone that has barely or NEVER been to Paris to give you a rating on the best restaurants. They’ll go to Yelp just like you and regurgitate 30 reviews. The authenticity is simply lost.

you-knew